Transportation

Did you ever think what true service is to disabled veterans? Since the inception of the DAV Transportation Program in our Commonwealth in 1987, we have traveled over 10,000,000 miles or 400 trips around the earth. These figures increase with the passing of each day. What is even more incredible, all these miles are driven by volunteer drivers who have accumulated over 750,000 volunteer hours. They have driven close to 300,000 veterans from their homes to VA medical centers for appointments. In addition we have purchased 67 vans and donated them to the VA medical centers for a cost of over $2,000,000 in conjunction with our organization’s Columbia Trust. The money raised for these vehicles is from our generous public and our own membership donations.

In Massachusetts we have 5 VA medical centers with 2 Hospital Service Coordinators (HSCs) who schedules the veterans’ rides and the volunteer drivers for these trips. These services are provided free of charge.

For some disabled veterans, reliable transportation means the difference between regular preventative health care and only discovering a condition once it has become acute. With the returning veterans who suffer traumatic brain injuries and amputations, this transportation service provides an invaluable resource for their care and readjustment back into society.

As an organization that advocates for veterans, we are aware of the need to develop partnerships with corporations in the Commonwealth that share these goals and understand the sacrifice of the men and women who served in our military. Commitment to their needs is a testament to them that as a community we care, and our resolve is unwavering. We are always looking for volunteer drivers so we can serve even more deserving veterans.

The need is great for Volunteer Drivers. If you are interested in becoming a Volunteer Driver, please call our office at 617-727-2974.

Timeline Photos88 years ago today in our nation's capital, thousands of veterans, many disabled, were protesting for their benefits when police and active duty military descend upon them.In 1924, Congress had rewarded WWI veterans with certificates redeemable in 1945 for $1,000. By 1932, many of these former servicemen were in dire straights due to the Depression. They asked Congress to redeem their bonuses early. When they refused, "The Bonus Army" marched on Washington to demand recognition and aid. This unarmed vigil was conducted with respect and decorum.On July 28 1932, Washington police began to clear the demonstrators. Two men were killed as tear gas and bayonets assailed the Bonus Marchers. President Hoover ordered an army regiment into the city, under the leadership of Gen. Douglas MacArthur. The army, complete with infantry, cavalry, and tanks, rolled in and burned their shanty settlements, forcing the Bonus Army to flee.In the end, the Bonus Army was denied their request, but in 1936, Congress passed a bill that helped these veterans get their pay early. President Roosevelt would veto the bill, but his veto was overridden by Congress. ...
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