DAV Auxilliary

An essential part of the DAV is its auxiliaries. While all of our veterans are special, no one knows more than those that are associated with the veteran, wife, son, daughter, nephew, niece, brother, sister and many more. The DAV auxiliary offers them voice in helping procure benefits that improve their wellbeing. The caregiver provision was a direct response to family members wanting to assist their veteran hero in personal care at home. Being an auxiliary member honors our veterans and shows them we care.

Become a Member of DAV Auxiliary

Thanks to dedicated members across the nation, the DAVA programs are far-reaching and the personal rewards fulfilling. Our members are diverse in their interests which is what has made the DAVA so successful. Our programs include Americanism, Community Service, Junior Activities, Legislative, and VA Voluntary Services. Foremost in our hearts is the goal of assuring benefit entitlement and compassion for our disabled veterans.

Life membership rate: $250
Age 80 and older: Free

Eligibility Requirements:

  • Family and extended family of any military veteran who was not dishonorably discharged.
  • Family and extended family of any person injured and still in active service in America’s armed forces.
  • Family and extended family of DAV Auxiliary members.
Timeline Photos88 years ago today in our nation's capital, thousands of veterans, many disabled, were protesting for their benefits when police and active duty military descend upon them.In 1924, Congress had rewarded WWI veterans with certificates redeemable in 1945 for $1,000. By 1932, many of these former servicemen were in dire straights due to the Depression. They asked Congress to redeem their bonuses early. When they refused, "The Bonus Army" marched on Washington to demand recognition and aid. This unarmed vigil was conducted with respect and decorum.On July 28 1932, Washington police began to clear the demonstrators. Two men were killed as tear gas and bayonets assailed the Bonus Marchers. President Hoover ordered an army regiment into the city, under the leadership of Gen. Douglas MacArthur. The army, complete with infantry, cavalry, and tanks, rolled in and burned their shanty settlements, forcing the Bonus Army to flee.In the end, the Bonus Army was denied their request, but in 1936, Congress passed a bill that helped these veterans get their pay early. President Roosevelt would veto the bill, but his veto was overridden by Congress. ...
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